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Apostrophes : Possession and Contraction - Using Apostrophes Correctly - Confusion English

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Introduction

Welcome to twominenglish.com. Teaching you English through two-minute lessons.

In this lesson, we will see the correct usage of apostrophes in English.

Explanation

Jenny: Hello! Our aim today is to discuss the correct use of apostrophes in English.

Parker: Hi Jenny! You know what? I often question myself if the apostrophe is indicating possession or contraction.

Jenny: Apostrophes are used to show that something belongs to something or someone else, or when we are combining together and shortening two words.

Parker: When I say “This is my wife’s makeup kit”, I am using possessive apostrophe, right?

Jenny: Yes. It is your wife’s. You are saying that your wife owns the makeup kit. When you use apostrophes for plural forms or nouns that end in ‘s’ already, you need to use it at the end of the word. And do not add another ‘s’ to the word in that case.

Parker: My wife has joined the ladies’ tennis club. Is this what you are talking about?

Jenny: Exactly. Do you know how to use the apostrophe in contractions?

Parker: I am not confident enough. Why don’t you tell me?

Jenny: You’ve just used it when you said ‘don’t’, Parker. You combined ‘do’ and ‘not’. Whenever we combine two words to make one word, we use the apostrophe at the spot where the combination occurs. For example when I say “We’ll” , I am combining the words “We” and “Will” and I am contracting them to “We’ll”.

Parker: Oh, I get it now. I’ll try out some examples after the lesson. See, my statement has a contractive apostrophe. I said ‘I’ll’ which combines ‘I’ and ‘will’.

Jenny : Good job, Parker. Looks like you’ve cracked this!

Parker: Should I summarize with a few examples to see if I got it all right?

Jenny: Sure, go ahead.

Parker: “Please keep this on the manager’s desk”, “This is my friend’s car”, “Tomorrow is my sister’s wedding day”. In these sentences the apostrophe’s used to indicate possession; to show that the object belongs to someone.

Jenny: Perfect, Parker. Good Job! Now let’s listen to some conversations.

Mary’s Lost Scarf.

Mitchell: Hey Luna, have you seen Mary’s scarf?

Luna: No, Mitchell.

Mitchell: She’s searching for it all over her room. It’s her favorite scarf.

Luna: Maybe she left it in Cara’s room.

Mitchell: She is so careless. Last time, she left her wallet in Mark’s car.

Catching Up.

Clint: Welcome, Luna. Would you like something to drink?

Luna: Thanks, Clint. I’d love some coffee.

Clint: Okay. So how’ve you been?

Luna: Good. Your house looks absolutely awesome.

Clint: Thanks, Luna.


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