Can You End a Sentence with _____?

Marcus Froland

Are you ever unsure about how to end your sentences in English? It can be confusing. This article breaks down whether you can end sentences with certain words. We’ve chosen a variety of examples, including nouns, verbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and more.

Our goal is to help you understand these rules better. By the end, you’ll have a clearer idea of how to construct sentences neatly and correctly in English, making your writing smoother and your communication clearer.

Can You End a Sentence with This?

Can You End a Sentence with a Preposition?

Answer: Yes!

You can end a sentence with a preposition in English, especially in informal speech or when the sentence sounds more natural without forcing the preposition to precede its object:

  1. What are you looking for?
  2. That’s something I hadn’t thought of.
  3. That’s the room she stayed in.
  4. Who were you speaking to?
  5. It depends on what you’re comfortable with.
  6. What city are you from?
  7. What was the noise caused by?
  8. That is something we need to think about.
  9. Where did they come from?
  10. What kind of music are you into?

Can You End a Sentence with a Noun?

Answer: Yes!

A sentence can effectively end with a noun quite commonly. Nouns are words that denote a person, place, thing, or idea. Here are examples where sentences end with a noun:

  1. My favorite animal is the elephant.
  2. She left her wallet in the car.
  3. He moved to New York last year.
  4. The last book you recommended was excellent.
  5. They adopted a puppy yesterday.

Can You End a Sentence with a Verb?

Answer: Yes!

While it might sound unusual, there are instances where sentences can end with verbs, especially in commands or imperative forms:

  1. Please sit.
  2. Just try.
  3. Don’t move.
  4. Help!
  5. Let’s go eat.

Can You End a Sentence with an Adverb?

Answer: Yes!

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs, often providing information about time, manner, place, or degree. Here are some examples of sentences ending with adverbs:

  1. She sings beautifully.
  2. They arrived yesterday.
  3. I will reply soon.
  4. They finished the project early.
  5. Drive carefully.

Can You End a Sentence with “Are”?

Answer: No, Usually can’t.

“Are” is a form of the verb “be” used with plural subjects. It’s rare and usually incorrect to end a declarative sentence with “are” because it leaves the thought incomplete:

Incorrect examples (usually questions, not statements):

  1. Where are?
  2. Who are?

Can You End a Sentence with “As Well”?

Answer: Yes!

“As well” is used to add additional information, similar to “too” at the end of sentences:

  1. I’d like a coffee as well.
  2. She’s coming to the picnic as well.
  3. They were all tired, and hungry as well.

Can You End a Sentence with “At”?

Answer: Yes, Occasionally.

Ending a sentence with a preposition such as “at” can be appropriate depending on the context:

  1. That is the chair I sat at.
  2. What are you laughing at?
  3. It depends on what you’re looking at.
  4. This is the situation we’re now at.
  5. Tell me who you were waving at.

Can You End a Sentence with “Be”?

Answer: Yes.

The verb “be” can end up at the end of a sentence or question when it is part of an infinitive verb phrase. The infinitive form often acts as the complement in terms of sentence structure:

  1. We can do whatever you want it to be.
  2. I am who I am meant to be.
  3. The color of that shirt is not what I want it to be.
  4. It’s not as easy as it seems to be.

Can You End a Sentence with “Because”?

Answer: No, Generally Not.

“Because” introduces a clause explaining the cause or reason for an action. Ending a sentence with “because” typically results in an incomplete idea:

Incorrect examples:

  1. I didn’t go because.
  2. She was upset because.

Can You End a Sentence with “But”?

Answer: No.

“But” is a conjunction typically used to introduce a phrase or clause contrasting with what precedes it. Ending a sentence with “but” usually leaves it hanging:

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Incorrect examples:

  1. They wanted to go, but.
  2. She tried, but.

Can You End a Sentence with “By”?

Answer: Yes.

It’s possible to end a sentence with “by” when it is used as a preposition indicating the performing of an action:

  1. That’s the house I walk by.
  2. Here’s the rule they abide by.
  3. Never forget the principles you live by.
  4. That’s the man she stands by.

Can You End a Sentence with “Can”?

Answer: No.

“Can” is a modal verb used to express ability or possibility. Ending a sentence with “can” generally results in an incomplete idea:

Incorrect examples:

  1. Yes, you can.
  2. Maybe we can.

Can You End a Sentence with “Did”?

Answer: Yes.

It’s somewhat rare but grammatically acceptable to end a question or a sentence where emphasis is placed on the action:

  1. “Did you complete your homework?” “I did.”
  2. She asked if anyone could help her, and he did.

Can You End a Sentence with “Do”?

Answer: Yes.

Like “did”, ending a sentence with “do” is possible especially in responses where it emphasizes an affirmative reply to a question or repeats the action for emphasis:

  1. “Do you need this book?” “Yes, I do.”
  2. They think we should leave now, and so do.

Can You End a Sentence with “Had”?

Answer: Yes, Occasionally.

“Had” can end a sentence in a context where it forms part of a contraction or is used rhetorically:

  1. I thought they would have finished by now, but they had not.
  2. “Who had finished their assignments?” “I had.”

Can You End a Sentence with “Has”?

Answer: Yes.

Similar to “had”, “has” can be used at the end of a sentence under certain circumstances, particularly in response to questions about possession or completion:

  1. “Who has the tickets?” “She has.”
  2. It seems no one else has.

Can You End a Sentence with “Have”?

Answer: Yes.

“Have” can conclude a sentence when it’s part of a question or responding to a query:

  1. “Do all participants have their materials?” “Yes, they have.”
  2. I know they should do it, but I don’t think they have.

Can You End a Sentence with “However”?

Answer: Yes.

“However” can end a sentence when it is used to refer back to a contrasting idea mentioned previously, although it is more common to see it in the middle or at the start of a sentence:

  1. She promised to come early. She arrived late, however.
  2. I intended to buy a new laptop. I decided to wait, however.

Can You End a Sentence with “Is”?

Answer: No.

You cannot end a sentence correctly with “is” in standard English. “Is” is a linking verb and needs a subject complement following it.

Examples:

  1. This is where the party is. No – Correct noun needed after “is.”
  2. The question is. No – Incomplete; needs a complement.
  3. That’s how complicated it is. No – Correct with a noun after “is.”
  4. What the problem is. No – Fragment; needs a main clause.
  5. Tell me where she is. No – Indirect question; requires more information.

Can You End a Sentence with “Like”?

Answer: Yes.

“Like” can end a sentence in informal contexts, especially in spoken English:

  1. “I don’t know what people like her are like.” – Yes, informal but correct.
  2. “Tell me what it was like.” – Yes, grammatically correct.
  3. “That’s just the way things are like.” – No, incorrect usage.

Can You End a Sentence with “Me”?

Answer: Yes.

“Me” can end a sentence when it is the object of the sentence or clause:

  1. Can you come with me?
  2. They were looking for someone to join them, and they chose me.
  3. Please sit beside me.
  4. They gave the book to me.
  5. Do you remember me?

Can You End a Sentence with “Not”?

Answer: Yes.

Sentence ending with “not” are not uncommon, but usually they involve contracted forms or require the context of negation that has been established in previous parts of the conversation or text:

  1. “Are they coming to the party?” “I think not.”
  2. “Do you agree with this policy?” “Certainly not.”
  3. You’re joking, right? Not!
  4. She said she would come, but she did not.
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Can You End a Sentence with “Of”?

Answer: Yes.

Ending a sentence with “of” is generally acceptable in informal contexts, especially in questions or exclamations. It often occurs when the object of a preposition is understood or omitted in casual speech, making it a practical, albeit informal, choice in conversational English scenarios:

  1. What are you thinking of?
  2. Is that the type of movie you’re fond of?
  3. He’s the strangest man I’ve heard of!
  4. Is there much left of?
  5. Which university are you a graduate of?

Can You End a Sentence with “Only”?

Answer: Yes.

Ending a sentence with “only” is perfectly fine, often adding an element of emphasis, exclusivity or limitation to the statement:

  1. I came for this only.
  2. That was his hope, to see her only.
  3. It was available yesterday only.
  4. She wanted that one only.
  5. Tickets are free on Sundays only.

Can You End a Sentence with “Since”?

Answer: Yes, but Rarely.

“Since” can be used at the end of a sentence in informal conversation in contexts where it refers to time, reason, or causality and has been previously specified:

  1. “How long have you been waiting?” “Since.”
  2. We haven’t seen them since.

Can You End a Sentence with “So”?

Answer: Yes.

“So” can be used at the end of a sentence, particularly when the result or effect has been implied but not explicitly stated,  leaving some parts unstated but understood:

  1. I guess I’ll leave early, so.
  2. They were all out of options, so.
  3. I thought you were busy tonight, so.
  4. Are you going to tell him, or so?
  5. They’re not sure if they can make it, so.

Can You End a Sentence with “That”?

Answer: Yes, Occasionally.

This typically happens when “that” is used as a demonstrative pronoun and the noun it refers to is omitted because it is clear from the context. It also can occur in conversational or informal English, where parts of sentences are left implied:

  1. I didn’t know you could do that.
  2. She bought the same dress as you – that!
  3. Is it really that easy?
  4. I didn’t realize it was that.
  5. Which one? That.

Can You End a Sentence with “The”?

Answer: No, Generally Not.

The” is a definite article used before a noun to specify that the identity of the noun is known to the reader. It is grammatically awkward and incorrect to end a sentence with “the” because it should always be followed by a noun or noun phrase to complete its meaning.

There are no standard cases or examples where “the” appropriately ends a sentence in formal or even informal English usage.

Incorrect examples:

  1. Look at the house on the hill. Do you like the?
  2. We were talking about the.

Can You End a Sentence with “With”?

Answer: Yes.

Ending a sentence with “with” is acceptable particularly when it functions within an idiomatic expression, a question, or casual conversation:

  1. This is the person I was talking about earlier, the one I’m in the project with.
  2. Is that what you came up with?
  3. That’s not what I wanted to deal with.
  4. Who are you going with?
  5. Is this what you came up with?

Can You End a Sentence with “Them”?

Answer: Yes.

“Them” can effectively end a sentence, especially when it’s used as a pronoun referring to previously mentioned objects or people. Ending a sentence with “them” is grammatically correct and quite common in both spoken and written English:

  1. Those were the days; I miss them.
  2. I haven’t seen them.
  3. Hand those books to me; I’ll take care of them.
  4. Are you going with them?
  5. She received the instructions but didn’t read them.

Can You End a Sentence with “Then”?

Answer: Yes.

“Then” can end a sentence, usually when it functions as an adverb referring to a sequence or time:

  1. We’ll decide then.
  2. Tell me by then.
  3. If not now, when then?
  4. I thought so then.
  5. Let’s meet up then.
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Can You End a Sentence with “There”?

Answer: Yes.

“There” can end a sentence, particularly when used as an adverb indicating place:

  1. “Where should I put this?” “Put it over there.”
  2. Look over there.
  3. They went to Paris last year and loved it there.
  4. Is he still waiting there?
  5. She left her notebook there.

Can You End a Sentence with “This”?

Answer: Yes.

“This” typically serves as a demonstrative pronoun referring to a specific object, person, place, or issue previously mentioned or understood from context:

  1. I can’t believe this.
  2. Look at this.
  3. Do you need this?
  4. I don’t understand this.
  5. She didn’t explain this.

Can You End a Sentence with “Though”?

Answer: Yes.

“Though” can be used at the end of a sentence as a conjunction, often adding a contrastive element to a previously mentioned statement:

  1. It was a bit expensive, I bought it though.
  2. The weather was terrible. We had fun though.

Can You End a Sentence with “Throughout”?

Answer: No.

“Throughout” implies coverage or distribution in every part of a certain place or during the whole of a specified period. Ending a sentence with “throughout” leaves the context incomplete, as it often requires specifying what has been spread throughout:

Incorrect examples:

  1. His influence was felt throughout.
  2. They were known throughout.

Can You End a Sentence with “To”?

Answer: Yes, but Rarely.

It’s uncommon but not entirely incorrect to finish sentences with “to” in instances where “to” refers to a directional or operational component and the context prior has made the meaning clear:

  1. “Where is this package going?” “To.”
  2. Can you send this document to marketing, and then forward it to?

Can You End a Sentence with “Too”?

Answer: Yes.

“Too” can be used at the end of a sentence to indicate also, in addition or to a greater degree:

  1. I would like some ice cream too.
  2. They went to Paris last summer. We visited too.

Can You End a Sentence with “Up”?

Answer: Yes.

“Up” can be utilized at the end of a sentence, especially in phrasal verbs or idiomatic expressions where “up” completes the meaning:

  1. It’s time to clean up.
  2. The meeting wrapped up.
  3. Time is up.

Can You End a Sentence with “Upon”?

Answer: No.

“Upon” is a preposition that brings about the necessity for a complement, referring to an event that might occur. Ending a sentence with “upon” without providing this information results in an incomplete thought:

Incorrect examples:

  1. His arrival was decided upon.
  2. They agreed upon.

Can You End a Sentence with “Was”?

Answer: No.

“Was” is a past form of the verb “be” and usually requires a subject and possibly additional information to form a complete thought.

Incorrect examples:

  1. The best part of the movie was.
  2. What they needed was.

Can You End a Sentence with “Were”?

Answer: No.

Like “was,” “were” serves as a plural past form of the verb “be” and similarly requires further information or a predicate to complete the sentence:

Incorrect examples:

  1. If only they were.
  2. The options available were.

Can You End a Sentence with “Yet”?

Answer: Yes.

The adverb “yet” can feasibly end a sentence, particularly within contexts that discuss something expected to happen up to a point in time but hasn’t happened:

  1. Has he arrived yet?
  2. The project isn’t finished yet.
  3. It’s not over yet.
  4. They haven’t called yet.
  5. I haven’t decided yet.

We’ve looked at many examples to show how some words can end sentences while others cannot. Remember, practice makes perfect. The more you use English, the more comfortable you will become with its sentence structures. Keep practicing by writing and speaking as much as you can.

If you make mistakes, no worries. It’s all part of learning. Hopefully, our guide today has cleared up some of your doubts and helped you on your journey to mastering English. Keep learning and keep trying.

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